On May 30, 1913, the conference, without the Ottoman Empire, signed the Treaty of London (1913), an agreement under which the Ottoman Empire was to abandon the entire territory west of the Enos-Midia Line. After much discussion on 29 July 1913, the ambassadors formally decided to establish the Principality of Albania as a sovereign state, independent of the Ottoman Empire. [3] The London Conference of 1912-1913, also known as the Peace Conference or Ambassadors of London, was an international summit of the six great powers of the time (Britain, France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia and Italy), convened in December 1912 due to the successes of the armies of the Balkan League against the Ottoman Empire during the First Balkan War. In particular, the conference between the belligerents should act as a mediator on territorial acquisitions and also decide the future of Albania, whose independence was proclaimed during the conflict. In 1913, many people in Austria and Germany – notably within the military leadership of the countries – had decided that a pre-emptive war against Serbia would be necessary to restore the reputation and power of the Empire; Given that Russia was almost certain to support Serbia in such a conflict, a third war in the Balkans would most likely lead directly to a general European war, with Germany and Austria-Hungary pitting it against Serbia, Russia, Russia`s main France and possibly the United Kingdom. But for now, Emperor William, the Emperor of Germany, and Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne, continued to defend the possibility of a peaceful solution to the Balkan question, although they disputed the means to achieve it. However, the assassination of François Ferdinand by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914 put an end to such negotiations and overthrew Europe, which was already teeming with unresolved conflicts and irreconcilable differences between the great powers until the First World War. As not everyone was satisfied with the Treaty of London, the Second Balkan War began on 13 June. Peace came after the Treaty of Bucharest on August 12, 1913. The Treaty of London was signed on 30 May 1913 to deal with territorial adaptations resulting from the end of the First Balkan War. …

State of Albania (London Treaty, 30 May 1913). In the second (June-July 1913), Bulgaria and the other Balkan countries (including Romania) fought for the partition of Macedonia, the Ottomans intervened against Bulgaria and conquered part of Eastern Thrace, including Edirne. The Ottomans had lost more when the conference began in September 1912 at St. James`s Palace, under the presidency of Sir Edward Grey. [1] Other meetings of the conference began on December 16, 1912, but ended on January 23, 1913, when the Ottoman coup took place in 1913 (also known as the invasion of the Serthe Gate). [2] The coup leader Enver Pasha withdrew the Ottoman Empire from the conference.